She’s Baaaack!

Many have been asking and I haven’t really wanted to jinx it too early, but I’m back. Since I last posted, I’ve had flu twice in addition to my injury. So it seems like I have been resting on my laurels for months and months.

To recap. I was a cripple right? Just after I wrote the last post, I visited my friendly chiropractor – Clifford Mead – to have my back and neck sorted out. The back and neck had gone awry with my constant limping because of the aforementioned crippledness. While I was there, I asked him to check on my ankle to see if he could just pull it back into place. When I was landing on my heel, heelstriker that I am, it constantly felt like my whole leg was landing at the same time. And then, as I pulled my foot up again, the heel was still stuck to the leg. Kind of like the shock absorber that I thought should have been on top of my heel, just wasn’t working. He pulled my ankle straight and angels sang and the wind whispered and a light shone through the clouds. Relief. Finally! Relief from a month of excruciating pain. I got up and e voila! No limping. He promised it would be tender for a few days while the muscles and tendons and ligaments got over the shock of being abused for so long and so it was. Ice. Heat. Ice. Heat. The next day was physio with Clare-Anne and there you have it people, I was back in business again. That was on a Wednesday and Thursday. The next Tuesday, I ran a personal best 5km Time Trial at RAC. The next day I got flu. I decided to carry on resting. I was running out of time because Easter 100km was coming up and I had to be in that. I missed Loskop ultra marathon and so knew Easter 100 would be my last attempt to do a truly long distance before Comrades.  I was better by the end of the week and I managed to get in a few training runs before the Easter 100.

And then I did the Easter 100. I’m not going to say much about it except I cried because I knew that the OH SHIT! Hill was on the route of the first day. I spent the 3 days “running” with my oldest friend, Jenny. Let’s just say that we took it very slowly and spent a great deal of time on our legs. 13 hours and 42 minutes is what my watch says….At that pace, we’ll miss the Comrades cut off by 22 minutes so I know we’ll be fine on the day because we…..really…..took…..our……time on those 3 days. At least at Comrades we get to do it all at once and not have to keep getting out of bed with sore legs to start all over again. By the way, Randburg Harriers organisers, that was a great event and very well organised. I would like to raise a concern, however, about the insanity of day 1’s route!

And then I got flu. Aggressively! On the Easter Monday, I couldn’t even get out of my bed. I just lay in bed the whole day, something I haven’t done since my 20s. I was out for the count until Saturday when I ventured off to track. I coughed up half my pleura on one of the laps and was lapped twice by Illuminati Michelle even though she had a much more hideous session than I had. On Sunday I managed a 21km training run with fartleks of kicking up and kicking back and flicking toes and marching and and and. I looked like a real schmuck as I ran along. As if I’m not already amusing enough, I had a whole host of people pointing and laughing at me while I did them. I just kept closing my eyes and saying to myself, “You’re going to run Comrades! You’re going to run Comrades!” This journey has brough me all sorts of humiliation. Not least of which was last night at track!  I’ll tell you about that when the sedatives have worn off. I took sedatives for the trauma.

So excited to be back, but just a litle disappointed that I won’t be doing Comrades in my fabulous silver heels. There’s always next year, I suppose.

Yours in the spirit of being back.

Slow Coach

P.S. I took my club shirt (the one in which I’m going to run Comrades) to have SlowCoach embroidered on the front and back so you’ll be able to recognise me on the road.

7 thoughts on “She’s Baaaack!

  1. Good news! Fingers crossed! Just keep up the good work. Don’t make the mistake that I have kept making. It is called a “taper” for a reason. Don’t stop (equally don’t keep too hard at it, but the former is so much easier to contemplate because you will be so much more rested for the race and, as they say, better under-trained than over-trained!). Sorry for you, but you have already used up the under-trained bit – you are allowed ‘flu once, not twice, and you can only have one injury! So there! I have (in past, failed attempts) lost considerable fitness in my so-called “taper” by not putting in enough effort. “Effort”, in this context, means gradually shorter distances with slightly higher intensity. You should feel so strong that you have to resist the temptation to go out too far or too hard. Good luck with the rest of your training and I hope to see you at a race or two shortly (that’s if I have any chance of keeping up with you!).

  2. well done sisi!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I can imagine how you fell after the run in terms of pain after 100kms but the achievement was and is still out of this World of challenges but you conquered it, I am so proud of you my dear, congratulation on your grandchild you have, you are a gogo now. means grand mom!!!!

    to all the insane and very CrAzYYYY people so called comrades runners I wish them all the best including myself. mina ngithi (I say) salute!!!!!!!!!!!

  3. Pingback: Slow Coach

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